Landowners

These blog posts cover timely topics of interest to landowners.

Fall Lawn Care Tips

September 6th, 2017

Leaf it on Your Lawn

Grass clippings and leaves return nutrients and organic matter to your lawn and soil, and prevent soil compaction caused by rain and foot traffic. Too many? Instead of bagging them, use excess leaf material in garden beds or add it to your compost bin for a good carbon (“brown”) source. Dead leaves also provide cover for wildlife during the colder months. According the National Wildlife Federation, “Removing leaves also eliminates vital wildlife habitat. Critters ranging from turtles and toads to birds, mammals and invertebrates rely on leaf litter for food, shelter and nesting material. Many moth and butterfly caterpillars overwinter in fallen leaves before emerging in spring.”* Are you eligible for a rebate on your compost bin, native plants, or rain barrel? Check communitybackyards.org.

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Summer Lawn Care Tips

June 19th, 2017

About Watering

  1. To water or not to water? It is important to make a decision about whether or not you’ll provide regular watering for your lawn to keep its green color, or let it go dormant in the summer. Dormancy is best suited for well-established lawns rather than new or heavily trafficked lawns. Residents in new developments may want to keep their lawns watered.
  2. Dormant grass is not dead. Turfgrasses are cool-season plants designed for dormancy when water is scarce, though they may look ugly and brown. After 4-6 weeks of no rain, even dormant grass needs to be watered.  Watering it once deeply (1-1.5 inches) will keep the roots alive without causing the grass to green up.  Remember that watering deeply and less often encourages deeper roots that are more drought-tolerant.
  3. Don’t tease your lawn with an occasional sprinkle.  Sporadic, irregular watering “confuses” your turf resulting in shallow rooting and stress.  If you’re watering, remember grass needs approximately 1” of water per week.  You can measure rainfall and irrigation with a rain gauge or even a tuna can. Read More
2016 Community Backyards participant with her new compost bin.

2016 Community Backyards participant with her new compost bin.

The Community Backyards Rebate program is set to re-launch on April 1, 2017 but workshops are currently being scheduled for the year and  you can register to attend one of our current in-person workshops starting today! So far we have workshops scheduled for Westerville, Canal Winchester, Bexley, New Albany and many around Columbus. To easily register online, visit our Franklin Soil and Water Eventbrite page.

Community Backyards will once again offer $50 or $100 reimbursements to residents after participation in the program and purchase of an approved backyard conservation item. Participation is necessary to receive a rebate, and participants must live in an eligible tax district. So get ready for spring and visit Community Backyards for more information on how you can participate today!

As with last year, orders placed through our Conservation Spring Tree and Plant sale will be eligible for reimbursement once you participate in the program. So make sure to order your trees before April 10, 2017. You can easily order your plants online through our shopping cart or you can view our January newsletter for an order form to mail in and to find more information on the different species we are offering this year.

The Community Backyards program will be starting its 2016 season Friday, April 1st! The program offers rebates to eligible residents for the purchase of a rain barrel, compost bin, or native plants and trees after they participate in an in-person workshop or an online course and quiz. Read More

Milkweed

Milkweed

The March Backyard Conservation Update is now available! Read More

Did you miss the January Backyard Conservation Update?

Learn how you can stay active while having an eco-friendly winter, stay up-to-date on the latest water quality stories in the news and Franklin Soil and Water upcoming events, and be in-the-know when it comes to soil and water conservation in Franklin County! Read More

James Cola (center) with FSWCD Director Jennifer Fish (left) and Urban Conservationist David Reutter (right)

James Cola (center) with FSWCD Director Jennifer Fish (left) and Urban Conservationist David Reutter (right)

FLOW (Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed), Laura Fay, and James Cola were recognized with the Conservation Steward Award at our 69th Annual Meeting and Board of Supervisors’ Election September 17th.

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The “First Flush”

August 3rd, 2015

Crawford Farms in July 2015

Crawford Farms in July 2015

Ever wonder what exactly enters your storm drains and makes its way into the waterways?  Next time there is a significant rainfall, take a look at the nearest forebay–pollutants including trash, chemicals, and oils are swept through the storm drain and directly into the waterway via the forebay.  This rush of pollutants during a rain event is known as the “First Flush.”

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In November’s Backyard Conservation  Update, we discuss: Read More

If you didn’t receive it in your in-box, here is the most recent edition of our Backyard Conservation Update.