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1404 Goodale Boulevard, Suite 100
Columbus, OH 43212
Phone: (614) 486-9613
Fax: (614) 486-9614

Developing Lands

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Welcome to the Developing Lands Page, where you'll find practical tips for protecting water quality on your construction site.

Quick Reference Links:The Clean Water Partner Poster below was developed to help provide education to staff and contractors that may not be able to attend in-person training events.  The poster highlights some of the most common practices encountered on a typical construction site and the purpose of each. Find information on each highlighted practice in the expandable tabs below.

If you are a developer in Franklin County, contact us to learn how you can get a Clean Water Partner Poster to display on your site!  Or call us at 614-486-9613



#1 Perimeter Controls

Silt Fence






Silt Fence is the most common type of perimeter control used on construction sites, but is not always installed correctly.  Silt Fence works best when placed along contours and in flatter areas that will allow water to pond behind.  Whenever possible, install silt fence in vegetated areas (or add temporary seeding) to provide additional filtration and erosion protection.  To work effectively, silt fence must be installed properly, which includes trenching fabric into the ground and twisting new sections together.  

Maintenance for silt fence includes checking sections for tears and removing accumulated sediments when they reach 50% of the total height.  Silt fence can also be damaged from vehicles and equipment or toppled by soil from stock piles.  Check fence perimeter weekly and after rain events, performing any needed maintenance/repairs as they are identified.

Wattles and Socks


















Wattles and Socks use straw, mulch, or compost to control and filter runoff and are commonly used in conjunction with, or in place of silt fence.  Like any practice, these wattles/socks need to be installed properly and regularly maintained to work effectively.   

Some of the benefits of using wattles or socks is that they are easy to install and can be moved to allow quick site access to vehicles/equipment.  Depending on the material used in the sock, they can be seeded and left in place past the construction phase.  Like silt fence, wattles/socks should be installed along contours in a way that allows water to collect behind them.  Some trenching may be needed to ensure the roll has good contact with the soil and should be staked into place.  If not installed properly, water and sediment can travel right underneath and lead to further erosion issues. 

These products come in many different diameter sizes to meet your needs, but if you are using wattles/socks as a silt fence replacement on a site that falls under the OEPA Construction General Permit (site disturbance of 1-acre or greater) you need a size that will meet the effectiveness of silt fence.  This generally means a 12-inch diameter wattle/sock.

Maintenance for wattles/socks includes checking sections for tears, ensuring good contact with the ground, and removing accumulated sediments when they reach 50% of the total height.  Sections can also be damaged from vehicles and equipment or toppled by soil from stock piles.  Check perimeter weekly and after rain events, performing any needed maintenance/repairs as they are identified.

Mulch or Filter Berms















Berms are another great way to handle runoff where it occurs as sheet flow.  Berms can be made from compost, mulch, or even wood chippings that might normally be hauled off site.  Berms can also be seeded to create a more permanent installation. Like silt fence, berms work best when placed along contours and in flatter areas, but while silt fences rely primarily on settling, compost filter berms filter runoff as it passes through the material.

Like other practices, berms should be inspected after rain events and collected sediments should be removed when they reach 1/3 of the exposed height of the practice.  At the end of construction berms can be seeded and left in place or material can be dispersed and stabilized.



#2 Inlet Protection






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Inlet Protection..

Maintenance:

 

#3 Construction Entrances






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Construction Entrances..

Maintenance:

  

#4 Protect Trees & Sensitive Areas



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Protect Trees & Sensitive Areas..

Maintenance:

  

#5 Dewatering











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Dewatering..

Maintenance:

  

#6 Swales

#7 Sediment Basins

#8 Concrete/Mortar/Paint Wastes



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Contain concrete/mortar/paint wastes..

Maintenance:

  

#9 Dumpsters



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Dumpsters..

Maintenance:

  

#10 Fueling Areas



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Fueling Areas..

Maintenance:

  

#11 SWPPP

#12 Stabilization